Tag Archives | CES

CES 2012 Was Big, Very Big

Whenever anyone asked me how my CES was going, I said something along the lines of “It seems pretty darn vibrant for a show that’s allegedly in trouble.” Now the official stats are in, and they report record-breaking numbers for both attendees and exhibitors. Chris Ziegler of the Verge:

The fact that neither Microsoft nor Apple are participating in these kinds of events anymore is certainly a sign of something, but 153,000 press, exhibitors, analysts, and staff are suggesting that the death knell could be a bit premature.


Be the first to comment

Steve Ballmer’s CES 2012 Keynote Live Coverage

Steve Ballmer CES 2012 Microsoft keynote live coverage

I’m sitting in Terminal 2 at San Francisco International Airport. But tonight at 6:30pm PT, I’ll be in Las Vegas at Steve Ballmer’s final Microsoft keynote at CES–and TIME’s Doug Aamoth and I will liveblog it one last time. You can join us at technologizer/ces12, and I hope you will.


Be the first to comment

The Case for CES


Over at the New York Times, Nick Wingfield has a story on CES 2012 with the gloomy title “A Tech Show Loses Clout as Industry Shifts.” He makes some good points. I’m not a CES apologist–in fact, I recently broached the question of whether Microsoft’s decision to pull out of the show after this year could conceivably be the beginning of the end, and wrote about some of its problems for Slate back in 2008.

Still, I came away from Wingfield’s piece unconvinced that there’s a new sea change going on in the industry that’s rendering CES less relevant than it has been in recent years.

Continue Reading →


Be the first to comment

The Celebrity Entertainment Show

CES LogoMost of the 150,000 or so people who will attend the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas next week are executives and other staffers from companies in the tech industry: hardware makers, service providers, and retailers. Several thousand other attendees are mediafolk like me: reporters, bloggers, and analysts.

And the third most-represented group? It may well be celebrities. They’re one of the most surefire ways to attract attention to a booth or a party, and so the companies exhibiting at the show bring them to Vegas by the truckload.

Continue Reading →


Be the first to comment

Join Us for Live Coverage of Steve Ballmer’s Final Microsoft Keynote at CES

Steve Ballmer CES 2012 Microsoft keynote live coverage

Next Monday at 6:30pm PT, Steve Ballmer will give what Microsoft says is the company’s final keynote at CES. I don’t know whether he’ll acknowledge that fact, in either a serious manner or a lighthearted one. But it’s a safe bet that he’ll talk about Windows 8, ultrabooks, Xbox, and Windows phone. And I’ll be in the audience, along with TIME’s Doug Aamoth. We’ll liveblog the event as it happens at technologizer.com/ces12. Join us, won’t you? (And if you need a reminder, head there now: You can get an e-mailed notification when the event begins.)

 


Be the first to comment

CES’s Founder is Still a CES Attendee

In the last post, I wondered if anyone who attended the first Consumer Electronics Show in 1967 is still attending. As commenter Tom Lauterback noted, one of the guys in the last photo in that post is the show’s creator, Jack Wayman. And as of 2011, he still goes to CES.


Be the first to comment

The More CES Stays the Same, the More It Changes

While rummaging through the official CES photo bank for an image of Steve Ballmer giving a CES keynote, I came across this picture of the show floor, jam-packed with booths, attendees, and stuff. (Click on it for a larger version.)

Consumer Electronics Show 1980

At first blush, this could be any year’s show–you can see Sony, Panasonic, Pioneer, and other companies that will be at next week’s edition. I might believe you for a moment if you told me this was last year’s show, which I attended.

Continue Reading →


Be the first to comment

CES Pay for Play? No Way

Yesterday, I received an e-mail from an employee of Ogilvy, a gigantic public-relations firm, that I found startling:Now, I get strange, questionable propositions over the transom–this one arrived via Technologizer’s contact form–all the time. I also receive offers which I choose to decline, such as ones involving companies footing the bill for travel to their media events. But a big PR firm offering what amounted to cash payments for coverage on behalf of a major tech company was a new one.

Continue Reading →


Be the first to comment

Resolutions and Keynotes

In case you’re keeping track, here’s some stuff I’ve written for other sites this week:
 
For TIME, I proposed a few new year’s resolutions for tech companies.
 
Also at TIME, I mused on the fact that at CES, everyone’s keynoter.
 
And at CNET, Microsoft’s CES departure made me think of IBM”s COMDEX departure.


Be the first to comment

A Brief History of Microsoft Vegas Keynotes (Now That They’re Going Away)

The Rock and Bill Gates introduce the original Xbox.

The Rock and Bill Gates introduce the original Xbox at CES in 2001.

Microsoft has announced that next month’s Steve Ballmer keynote at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas will be its last, and that it won’t have its own booth at the show. The move is unquestionably reminiscent of Apple’s 2008 decision to pull out of Macworld Expo, although Microsoft will still be a part of the show in other ways. It’s just ending its traditional, high-profile presence.

And what a long tradition it’s been. It started, of course, not with Ballmer but with Bill Gates. And it didn’t begin with CES. For years, a Gates keynote kicked off the now-defunct COMDEX show: He did them in Vegas in November and sometimes at Spring COMDEX in other cities.

(I’m not sure when Gates did his first COMDEX keynote, but he was doing them as early as 1983, and they became a ritual in the 1990s.)

I’ve always wondered just how much Microsoft benefited from all these keynotes. It’s used them as an opportunity to present its perspective on the future of computing. But as I wrote back in 2008, an awful lot of the things it unveiled at COMDEX and CES never amounted to much, including the Tablet PC, Windows Smart Displays, the Smart Watch, and the amazingly short-lived Urge music service. Unlike Apple, Microsoft rarely if ever saved up a big announcement until a keynote, so the PR bump wasn’t remotely in the same league as Apple’s Macworld events. And the copious use of uncomfortable-looking celebrity guest stars usually didn’t help matters.

Continue Reading →


Be the first to comment