The E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat Sheet

By  |  Monday, October 26, 2009 at 12:14 am

cheatsheetBy almost any imaginable definition, last week was the newsiest ever in the still-new world of e-book readers. We witnessed the unveiling of Barnes & Noble’s ambitious Nook. We got more details about Plastic Logic’s long-awaited device. We learned of an underdog known as the Spring Design Alex. We were informed that Amazon was killing the original Kindle 2 and lowering the price of the model with international roaming, and saw a demo of an upcoming Amazon Kindle reader application for Windows (a Mac version is also in the works). In short, the era in which it was logical to use “Kindle” as shorthand for “book-reading gizmo” is over.

It seems like a good time, then, to put some basic facts and figures about a bunch of major and/or new e-reader competitors in one place. After the jump, a quick Technologizer Cheat Sheet.


Amazon Kindle

Amazon Kindle With U.S. and International Wireless

In three words: Pioneering…getting stale?

Price: $259

Availability: Now

Books, etc: 360,000 books; newspapers, magazines, and blogs.

Screen(s): 6″ E-Ink; 16 shades of gray; 600 by 800 pixels

Dimensions and weight: 8″ by 5.3″ by .36″;  10.2 oz.

Battery life: Up to four days with wireless turned on; up to two weeks with it turned off

Input: Physical keyboard, buttons

Connectivity: AT&T 3G (international roaming available), USB

Battery life: Four days with wireless on; up to two weeks with wireless off

Memory: 2GB (1.4GB available)

Expansion: None

ePub e-book standard supported: No

PDF and DOC supported: Yes, through conversion

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Yes

Random other features: Reads books out loud unless disabled by publisher; rudimentary audio player and Web browser; Wikipedia

Readers for other devices: iPhone/iPod Touch, Windows and Mac in works

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Kindle DXAmazon Kindle DX

In three words: Kindle, only bigger.

Price: $489

Availability: Now

Books, etc: 360,000 books; newspapers, magazines, and blogs.

Screen(s): 9.7″ E-Ink; 16 shades of gray; 1200 by 824 pixels

Dimensions and weight: 10.4″ by 7.2″ by .38″;  18.9 oz.

Battery life: Up to four days with wireless turned on; up to two weeks with it turned off

Input: Physical keyboard, buttons

Connectivity: Sprint 3G, USB

Memory: 4GB (3.3GB available)

Expansion: None

ePub e-book standard supported: No

PDF and DOC supported: Yes

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Yes

Random other features: Reads books out loud unless disabled by publisher; rudimentary audio player and Web browser; Wikipedia

Readers for other devices: iPhone/iPod Touch, Windows and Mac in works

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Barnes & Noble Nook

Barnes & Noble Nook

In three words: Looks quite promising.

Price: $259

Availability: Late November

Books, etc: A million books, including 500,000 free titles; newspapers and magazines

Screen(s): 6″ E-Ink with 16 shades of gray and 3.5″ color touchscreen

Dimensions and weight: 7.7″ by 4.9″ by .5; 11.2 oz.

Battery life: Up to ten days with wireless turned off

Input: Touchscreen, physical buttons, onscreen keyboard

Connectivity: AT&T 3G (no word yet on international roaming as far as I know), Wi-Fi, USB

Memory: 2GB

Expansion: microSD slot

ePub e-book standard supported: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes for PDF; no for DOC

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Yes

Random other features: Books can be loaned to other users of Nook and B&N’s reader software for PCs, Macs, iPhones, and BlackBerries; plays MP3s

Readers for other devices: Windows, Mac, iPhone, BlackBerry

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

iRexiRex DR800SG

In three words: An interesting underdog.

Price: Both $399 and $449 have been reported

Availability: Late October (although while I was writing this, Best Buy removed it from its site)

Books, etc.: Via Barnes & Noble, a million books, including 500,000 free titles; newspapers and magazines; also has content from Newspapers Direct and LibreDigital

Screen(s): 8.1″ E-Ink

Dimensions and weight: 7.6″ by 5.9″ by .4; 14.9 oz.

Battery life: Not sure

Input: Stylus, physical buttons

Connectivity: Verizon 3G, USB

Memory: 2GB (via included microSD card)

Expansion: microSD slot

ePub e-book standard supported: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes for PDF; DOC not mentioned

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Via future firmware update

Random other features: None that I know of

Readers for other devices: None that I know of

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

QuePlastic Logic Que

In three words: Ship it already!

Price: TBA

Availability: Next year

Books, etc: Via Barnes & Noble, a million books, including 500,000 free titles; newspapers and magazines.

Screen(s): 10.7″ E-Ink

Dimensions and weight: .3″ thick; weighs “less than many periodicals”

Battery life: “days”

Input: Touchscreen

Connectivity: AT&T 3G, Wi-Fi, USB

Memory: Unspecified

Expansion: Unspecified

ePub e-book standard supported: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes

Dictionary: Unknown

Annotation: Yes

Random other features: Shatterproof plastic screen

Readers for other devices: Unknown

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Sony Reader Daily EditionSony Reader Daily Edition

In three words: Looks okay; pricey.

Price: Announced in August at $399 (but with the Kindle having undergone two price cuts since then and the Nook coming in at $259, you gotta wonder whether Sony will cut the price)

Availability: December

Books, etc.: “Thousands” of titles from Sony E-Book Store; a million free books from Google

Screen: 7″ E-Ink; 800 by 600; 16 shades of gray

Dimensions and weight: Unspecified as far as I know

Battery life: Up to two weeks with wireless shut off

Input: Physical buttons

Connectivity: AT&T 3G, USB

Memory: 2GB

Expansion: Memory Stick Pro and SD slots

ePub e-book format supported: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes (conversion of DOC requires Word installed on PC)

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Yes

Random other features: MP3 and AAC music playback

Reader software for other devices: Windows, Mac

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Sony Reader Pocket EditionSony Reader Pocket Edition

In three words: Smaller and cheaper.

Price: $199.99

Availability: Now

Books, etc.: “Thousands” of titles from Sony E-Book Store; a million free books from Google

Screen: 5″ E-Ink; 800 by 600; 8 shades of gray

Dimensions and weight: 6.25″ by 4.25″ by .4″; 7.76 oz.

Battery life: 2 weeks

Input: Physical buttons

Connectivity: USB

Memory: 512MB; 440MB available

Expansion: None

ePub e-book format supported: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes (conversion of DOC requires Word installed on PC)

Dictionary: No

Annotation: No

Random other features: None that I know of

Reader software for other devices: Windows, Mac

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Sony Reader Touch EditionSony Reader Touch Edition

In three words: Really needs wireless.

Price: $299.99

Availability: Now

Books, etc.: “Thousands” of titles from Sony E-Book Store; a million free books from Google

Screen: 6″ E-Ink; 800 by 600; 8 shades of gray

Dimensions and weight: 6.9″ by 4.8″ by .4″; 10.1 oz.

Battery life: 2 weeks

Input: Touch

Connectivity: USB

Memory: 512MB; 380MB available

Expansion: Memory Stick Pro and SD slots

ePub e-book format supported: Yes

Dictionary: Yes

Annotation: Yes

PDF and DOC supported: Yes (conversion of DOC requires Word installed on PC)

Reader software for other devices: Windows, Mac

Random other features: MP3 and AAC audio playback

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

Spring Design AlexSpring Design Alex

In three words: More info, please!

Price: TBA

Availability: Unclear

Books, etc: Still signing up content providers, apparently

Screen(s): 6″ E-Ink and 3.5″ color touchscreen

Battery life: Unspecified

Connectivity: Unclear, but mention of 3G, EVDO, and Wi-Fi

Memory: Unspecified

Expansion: SD slot

ePub e-book format supported: Unspecified

Dictionary: Unspecified

Annotation: Yes, apparently

PDF and DOC supported: Unspecified

Reader software for other devices: Unknown

Random other features: Multimedia capabilities of some sort

Previous Technologizer coverage: Here

I could go on–the TIME slideshow has some more contenders, all of which are obscure, unreleased, and/or unavailable in the U.S.–but that’s all for now. Any of these particularly tickle your fancy? Looks like the Nook will definitely shake things up, and the Que is potentially significant…

 
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57 Comments For This Post

  1. DJ JOHNSON Says:

    Thank you for the great comparison of ebook readers. Hopefully, you will provide future reviews for each ebook reader based on performance. This would help before purchasing.

  2. badbob001 Says:

    Nook: According to CNET (http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-10374792-1.html), the main screen resolution is 600×800, the same as other 6 inch e-ink displays. The color touch display is reported to be 480×144. In BN’s nook faq, it says with wireless on and/or music usage, battery need changing after two days.

    DR800SG: the screen resolution is 768×1024, the same as the irex’s previous iliad product and what e-ink specs for their 8.1 inch screens. Specs galore here: http://www.linuxfordevices.com/c/a/News/Irex-DR800SG/?kc=rss

    Sony Read Daily Edition: it would be strange for the taller screen to still have a resolution of 600×800. I would guess it’s going to be 600×1024.

  3. Doug Says:

    Not quite completely fair — for “support doc files?” you sometimes put “yes with conversion” and sometimes put “no”. Compare the Sony and B&N Nook for example. Does either support doc files natively? No. Can both display doc files that have been converted for the device? Sure. There’s tools to convert word to PDF, HTML, EPUB, so there’s ways to get the stuff in there.

    That’s one problem with this comparison that I was able to quickly catch on my own, but it leaves me wondering what I might be missing.

  4. Harry McCracken Says:

    @doug: I cheerfully admit that this Cheat Sheet isn’t definitive or completely consistent. I don’t feel guilty about drawing a distinction between e-readers that provide some sort of means for converting DOC files (as the 6″ Kindle does) and those that don’t–and when I said Barnes & Noble’s Nook didn’t support DOC, I based it on Barnes & Noble’s own comparison chart between the Nook and the Kindle, which puts a red x next to “Word document support” for the Nook:

    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/nook/compare/

    –Harry

  5. Kirk Says:

    The problem with e-ink is that it sucks. I just got a Kindle – I live in France – and am returning it. The contrast is so bad that it’s pretty much unreadable without bright light on the screen. In the sun it’s great, but at home it truly sucks. I’m astounded why people are buying this thing and keeping it. Am I missing something?

  6. jhn Says:

    Your book availability figures are misleading because you’re swallowing B&N’s b.s. that they have millions of books. What matters is in-copyright books, and from what I can tell you’re more likely to get current fiction and nonfiction books on the Kindle than any other device.

    It’s a cinch to read public domain Project Gutenberg and Google Books on the Kindle (and any computer, and most phones, etc etc) but Amazon doesn’t include those titles as part of its “library.” Rightly so, they’re already part of everyone’s library. If we care about the future of digital books we should teach people about things like PG so they do not have to be spoonfed pre-exisiting content and don’t get tricked into buying out-of-copyright texts with no value added.

  7. David V. Says:

    My favourite e-book reader: iPhone. I mostly use the Kindle app on it (but got the B&N app too, in case it offers an advantage). I have it with me all the time, and I find it remarkably comfortable to read (unexpected, because of the screen size). Quasi-all my fiction reading now happens on that device.

  8. Harry McCracken Says:

    @jhn I don’t think I swallowed anyone’s BS–the numbers quoted in the story are those claimed by the manufacturer, and you’re absolutely right that the sheer quantity of books is far less important than whether a reader has the book you want.

    I look forward to reviewing the Nook, and when I do I’ll judge it on how the selection compares to Amazon in terms of in-copyright books of interest to real people.

    –Harry

  9. JGowan Says:

    Thanks for the brief rundown — only a handful of these have really gotten any press or many dollars so I think it’s far to early to tell. As a whole, I think tech writers and the public at large wants ONE product to win (the one they buy) — why can’t their be lots of e-Readers and lots of winners?

    Of course, in a write up such as this, how could you not give Apple even a mention (they have e-Reader software for their iPod Touch andn iPhone — also considering the amount of press the rumored tablet has received, you would think, Harry, you could join the fray.

    Root tootin’ & Horn blastin’,
    JGowan
    “You’ve got your peanut butter in my opinion”

  10. Karen Wester Newton Says:

    Excellent summation! I particularly like the three word summaries– although I don’t consider my Kindle 2 stale. I’ll watch for your opinion of the Nook and the QUE once they’re out. Is B&N being coy? No one seems to have really tried one and they’re supposed to ship in less than 30 days.

  11. kickstand Says:

    Anybody remember the Franklin Rocket eBook? Whatever happened to that?

    http://www.amazon.com/Franklin-Electronics-EB-500-Rocket-eBook/dp/B00000JSFS

  12. me Says:

    Another one recently announced (at the Frankfurt Book Fair) is from txtr see http://www.crunchgear.com/2009/10/15/new-e-reader-txtr-germanys-answer-to-the-kindle/ and their own website http://www.crunchgear.com/2009/10/15/new-e-reader-txtr-germanys-answer-to-the-kindle/

  13. qwe Says:

    Please report DPI and contrast of the screens, otherwise it’s meaningless.

  14. sandbaggerone Says:

    Don’t forget the Story.

    One other category that would be useful, if difficult to track, is international availability. This is especially important with regards to content providers. For that reason the only choice for me is the International Kindle. The Nook looks sweet, but it’ll be years before it releases outside of the US.

  15. Mike Says:

    So let me get this straight: Yet another e-book guru who has never used one? Or used one for a just week?

    I’m not going to comment on any of your specific statements. I’ll just pass along some personal experience: Get 50,000 pages under your belt. Then you’ll know what you’re talking about. You’re perspective changes and your preconceptions evaporate.

  16. dog Says:

    Forgot the astak ezreader.

  17. Harry McCracken Says:

    @mike: Who’s this e-book guru (I’m not one) who has never used one (I’ve owned several, have reviewed them here and elsewhere, and have read thousands of pages on them)?

    –Harry

  18. i1patrick Says:

    I may very well be in the minority on this, but until an eBook reader includes a backlight, I’m not interested. The primary reason (>95%) I want an eBook reader device is to read in bed at night with all other lighting off. Battery life is a non-issue since there’s a plug-in readily available where I will be using the device. They may be backlit, but for me, a laptop/netbook is over-sized for reading.

    The whole reason for the eBook market segment to exist is to do away with the limitations of paper books. One of greatest of those limitations is the ability to read at night. Seems like a logical problem to try to solve.

    Once a company builds a reader with this feature, they’ve earned my eBook purchasing dollars. And my wife’s gratitude.

  19. Anne Says:

    Do any of these *not* have the white-to-black-to-white flicker on changing pages? I suspect it’s an eInk problem but it makes ebook readers unusable for me as it just disrupts my reading; I’d love to find one that’s cured the problem.

  20. Gregg D. Says:

    @i1Patrick: Considering that e-readers are the killer app for e-ink technology, there will never be an e-reader with a backlight. That’s because e-ink is designed to mimic the optical properties of printed paper — and so far, society has done just fine without backlit books.

    Kidding aside, reading on a backlit screen for long periods causes eyestrain, which is why e-ink was invented. But if you really want to read on a backlit screen, then you can just get an e-reader application for your smartphone or PC.

  21. Dennis Says:

    Patrick, I’m totally with you. I love a backlight. I still have an old ebook reader t hat has a backlight, and although i can longer add books, it was my favorite. I do use my iphone in bed for now. I do hope someone will add a backlight.

  22. Jeannie Says:

    There’s another really nice ebook reader comparison site for Kindle, Nook and Sony ereaders. It offers a crisp side-by-side chart so you can compare features.

    The site is:
    http://ebookreader.compare2save.net

  23. Rita Says:

    I love handling books owning writing in sharing and carrying books– until this yr. Some books are too heavy for my sprained thumbs. I was loaned a Kindle! I didn’t love it but I do love the idea of having acess to book anywhere anytime and not hurting my wrist and thumbs from the weight. Can I imagine buying the Nook?no it does not have text to speech. The Kindle has to many qwerks. The Sony expensive. I am waiting For a product with the following

    size of paperback, .4weight or close
    text to speech w/headphones and audio
    back lit option
    expandable port
    easy access to material without a computer
    color touch screen
    shock resistent cover included
    Price: under $300
    and I will buy.

  24. Jim DeFilippi Says:

    When I buy my first e-reader, I don’t plan on spending a lot of money on downloading books, so I’m basically interested in e-readers that handle PDFs (like the free ones at brownfedorabooks.com) efficiently.

  25. Jerry Limonta Says:

    Check out the MS courier here: http://www.ereaderuniverse.com/page/microsoft-courier

  26. Jarom Worthen Says:

    Here is my question. I really like the feature of the NOOK. to me looks like the best on at a manageable price point. However I think that the NOOK, Kindle and other are are falling on there on swords. Far as I can see the Sony is the only one that lists the ability to have access to ebooks from your public library. After “checking out 4 books for free (your taxes pay it) your $300 is now a better value than the Kindle 2 and NOOK at $260. I read 2-4 books a month, AT Amazon and B&N book prices that is $20-40 a month. Where as a Sony reader I could avoid this. Why would should I consider the others. No one can say it The Kindle and the NOOK can access public library eBooks. If any does have info on this please let me know.

  27. joh Says:

    Nice cheat sheet. Just needs adding the BeBook from Endless Ideas

  28. MT Says:

    Thanks for the help; my review of Kindle will help you visualize how much you have helped me in my review. Gr8 job.
    Keep up.

  29. Joe Says:

    Listen up people. The first company to make a basic ebook reader for 50 bucks will sell a billion of them. All you need is a screen and a USB and enough memory for one book and a newspaper. It should be rigged to not allow copies. You don’t need wireless internet access or a giant memory capacity. You leave it hooked up to your computer at home and you take off in the AM with a novel and a copy of the newspaper. AND the ebooks should cost a faction of the hard cover price. At these prices they should give the screens away.

  30. Cesar Says:

    Talking about E-Readers, check this one out.
    It is about the Skiff Reader, bendable metal foil instead of glass.
    I haven’t seen it in your reviews:

    http://www.skiff.com/skiff-reader.html

  31. Lisa Says:

    We have a Nook at our house and absolutely love it! The only con that my Mom has found so far is that in airplane mode it doesn’t save your pages so you have to “flip” to that page. It’s nice that it’s got a touch screen at the bottom, very easy to read and you can change the font and it’s size if you need to. I read it in our house with no problems and though we live in the boonies the wireless picks up easily. We are definitely enjoying it and tons of books to read at good prices.

  32. Joker Says:

    Do any of the ebook manufactuerers plan on adding a back light. I won’t buy one till they do.

  33. Gregg D. Says:

    For the love of God, people: E-READERS USE E-INK. Backlighting an e-book is no more necessary or sensible than backlighting an ACTUAL BOOK. It’s NOT a computer screen, and that’s the whole point!

  34. Marilyn Says:

    I purchased a Kindle 1 with many books on it. When I used my computer to charge the battery, they all disappeared. Now what do I do? It is an expensive paperweight.

  35. Gregg D. Says:

    Marilyn: You still own all of the e-books that you purchased thru Amazon. If you get your Kindle working again, you can re-download them back to the device at no additional cost. You can even read them on an iPhone or PC using the Kindle app.

  36. Marilyn Says:

    I am a techno dummy. I bought a Kindle 1 (from an individual) with 300 books already on it, but when I charged the battery, all disappeared.

    What can I do now with this expensive doorstop? Thanks, and please use small words. Do not assume I know any Internet terms.

  37. Dan Says:

    The Nook is problematic it has a slow page rate the battery seems to lose its charge as soon as you turn it on. Loading books is easy but you are not sure you have them. I loaded three books before I went to Europe when I arrived it would not let me open them. It is also annoying that you can’t down load anything from overseas even with a wifi connection. I also find their interface screen slow and unresponsive to load another book from your library it takes to long and in this device uses precious batter life. I have bough a new battery hopping that it would improve the problem it made no difference. B&As costumer service is hard to reach and not sympathetic. I do not recommend this device I have had better luck with the Kindle and the Sony .

  38. Melissa Says:

    I see that people feel very passionate about either having a back light, or that it shouldn’t have a back light. Although, I don’t completley feel either way I definitely believe we should have the option. Shouldn’t it come with one that you can disable if you don’t want it. I see that some people don’t want to hurt there eyes, well then that would be someone who could just turn it off. But we should at least have the option, so that if we are in bed and our spouse needs to go to sleep but we want to read we can.

  39. Sharon Says:

    There is a back lit Ereader out there that you can still buy books on. It is at http://www.ebookwise.com I use mine almost every night when I wake up and can’t sleep. I also have a kindle & a sony ereader but never use them because they are not back lit. I love my ebookwise reader.

  40. ebook readers Says:

    Thanks for the cheat sheet, been looking for something categorized.

    Bk

  41. Peter T Says:

    Ok. My question is, why is most of this technology so expensive? What makes the cost so heavy? e-ink? Couldn't these ereaders be made at a fraction of the cost with oh- lets say technology we had 20 years ago. LCD, anyone? Take a look at Nintendo's new e-reader for more information: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thu

    That's right! A GAMEBOY! The original gameboy from 1989 could do all this, and by all this I mean display black and white pixels. Original Cost? 189 dollars. The prices above range from $200 to $500. 500 clams?!? Jesus! And you can't even jump on a goomba(kidding)!

    Oh wait! What's this!? Nintendo has just released another ereader with a function that no ereader has. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_Boy_Advance_SP

    That's right, the 2004 Game Boy Advanced had a backlight. So let's say you're some where other then at a starbucks at midday, you can still be reading. I shit you not, once most people catch on to this, you'll be seeing upgraded "advanced illumination" technology. Amazon's "Kindle Midnight", with taglines like "Read Eli Wiesel's Night at night!" . They will double the e-ink too and call it HD.

    In my opinion none of these products seem justified when it comes to my wallet. I was going to recommend a certain $100 ereader, but I just checked prices and they jacked their cost up $20.
    Greed greed greed. Good luck guys. I'm going to go read a book.

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  45. pipsa Says:

    I just don't understand all these negative comments about ppl wanting a backlight. For me ereader would be mostly for following purposes: reading in bed without lights (lights cause complains from other side of the bed), reading while flying and at least the routes I use frequently lights flicker on and off, nights time in trains where the lights are turned off or dimmed very low level because most ppl like to sleep (sometime I even use flashlight :P but those disturb other ppl). yes I do also read during normal daylight hours but I would definetly go for a reader WITH backlight.

  46. Rob Says:

    Don't be a Jerk Greggy. Lots of people read at night or at places that would require backlighting. An option to backlighting would be useful. The crappy dismissive answer of it causes eye strain. Is flimsy at best. It is a missing component (an opportunity for a company) that many cannot do without. It takes someone creative to solve a problem like that. It should not be like a computer screen either, Greggy. The WHOLE POINT GREGGY is that people have different needs and companies need to account for that. And eReaders are not only about eInk you idiot.

  47. Rob Says:

    I appreciate what you are saying Melissa and I agree. We should have options. But the hurt their eyes thing is rather silly. If people are so concerned about their eyes get books on tape/cd. In a culture dominated by movies, tv, video games, computers, cell phones, etc… (all BACKLIT), it is just silly to say that reading on a something with minimal backlighting that you would be able to control the intensity of is going to hurt anyone or make that big a difference.

  48. dreambox dm600 pvr Says:

    iPone do lots to my life, but there are also something tangled me. Quasi-all my fiction reading now happens on that device.

  49. @TeachReed Says:

    There is such competition between the Kindle ebook reader (http://www.amazingkindle.info), the Nook and iPad that it is inevitable that change and technology will win out. What's next? http://www.ipadreviewblog.info

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  55. gayle Says:

    Thanks for the cheat sheet… I like my NookColor, but truth be told the battery life isn't great and it is hard to read in the sun. If I could afford it, I would also buy the All New Nook and have both. My 7 year old does however LOVE my nookcolor because he can read his books or have them read to him.

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21 Trackbacks For This Post

  1. Comparing eBook Reader Choices With New “Cheat Sheet” « ResourceShelf Says:

    [...] Note: The entry for the Amazon Kindle and Kindle DX lists that Sprint is the wireless provider. According to this article from mocoNews, Sprint is being replaced by AT&T for all Kindle devices sold from this point forward. Kindles [...]

  2. Why you probably should NOT buy an e-reader this year | TeleRead: Bring the E-Books Home Says:

    [...] E-book comparison matrix from DealNews, via D.A. Also see Technologizer’s cheat seet (via Reading 2.0 list). Digg us. Slashdot us. Facebook us. Twitter us. Share the [...]

  3. Apple Tablet Frenzy « Screenwerk Says:

    [...] Related: Technologizer eReader “Cheat Sheet.” [...]

  4. Links de 26-Outubro-2009 : Ponto Media Says:

    [...] The E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat Sheet – [...]

  5. Linked: A Cheat Sheet to all the E-Readers on Market – Novelr - Making People Read Says:

    [...] is slightly sad, really: a cheatsheet to the E-Reader explosion. Only the first three are worth looking at. Category: Linked [...]

  6. Wayne's Workshop » Blog Archive » Daily Run Down: 10-26-2009 Says:

    [...] McCracken has a great rundown of the current [...]

  7. Glen Sharp’s Blog » Blog Archive » eBook Reader Roundup Says:

    [...] at the technologizer blog there is a roundup of eBook readers. The plethora of new ereaders being introduced is indicative that this market is heating up but a [...]

  8. TECHNUT TUESDAY Market Nut Says:

    [...] E-Reader Cheat Sheet – (Technologizer) [...]

  9. Top Posts « WordPress.com Says:

    [...] The E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat Sheet By almost any imaginable definition, last week was the newsiest ever in the still-new world of e-book readers. We [...] [...]

  10. La explosión del mercado de lectores de e-books | Globbos Says:

    [...] Ya que este mercado cada vez se vuelve mas competitivo se han hecho algunas comparaciones de distintos lectores de libros electrónicos, los cuales compiten fuertemente en Estados Unidos por el negocio de los lectores de e-books. Amazon, la tienda de libros en línea, es quien se encuentra en la cima de estos dispositivos con su Kindle 2 y Kindle DX, que son los mas usados en ese país, según la comparativa hecha por el sitio Technologizer. [...]

  11. The Year of the E-Reader | PC User Clinic Says:

    [...] has a very good breakdown on E-Readers and this article provides links to additional [...]

  12. Rowland Institute Library Blog » Library News & Notes 10/30/09 Says:

    [...] Formats and Future See also: The E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat Sheet (Source: [...]

  13. New Articles of Interest Says:

    [...] and gets suedSmartphone eBook Readers MultiplyEverything We Know About Apple's Touchscreen TabletThe E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat SheetDavid Rothman: How e-Books Could Smarten Up Kids and Stretch Library Dollars: A National [...]

  14. E-Ink Gets More Appealing | Technologizer Says:

    [...] that Amazon released its first Kindle. And when I do, I usually express my reservations about the E-Ink screens used by the Kindle and all of its direct competitors. Yes, they’re glare-free and run for days on a charge. But the technology’s [...]

  15. ISC’s Blog » Post Topic » WBER + Capital Project=Lots of 21st century learning tools Says:

    [...] E Readers cheat sheet [...]

  16. NewzBeta – Blossoming of E-Readers In A Strange Time For Media Says:

    [...] The E-Reader Explosion: A Cheat Sheet [...]

  17. Scholastic on the Decade’s Ten big ideas in Education: Where are 21st c. Skills? « 21k12 Says:

    [...] Technology — From interactive whiteboards to online education, 1-to-1 computing to eReaders, for the first time in the history of American education, classrooms are increasingly plugged in [...]

  18. On Our Minds @ Scholastic: The Decade’s 10 Big Ideas in Education « George’s Weblog Says:

    [...] Technology — From interactive whiteboards to online education, 1-to-1 computing to eReaders, for the first time in the history of American education, classrooms are increasingly plugged in [...]

  19. Justin The Librarian VS. E-Books « Justin The Librarian Says:

    [...] This article helped me a lot. Leave a Comment No Comments Yet so far Leave a comment RSS feed for comments on this post. [...]

  20. Why I want a decent ebook reader…. | Another Cool Blog Says:

    [...] (as opposed to the limited libraries some of the ebook reader vendors make available). From this comparison it seems that we are almost there.. This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the [...]

  21. On Our Minds @ Scholastic » The Decade’s 10 Big Ideas in Education Says:

    [...] Technology — From interactive whiteboards to online education, 1-to-1 computing to eReaders, for the first time in the history of American education, classrooms are increasingly plugged in [...]